DynaLearn Videos

These videos are currently in development and any of them might change in the future.

General videos

LS1

LS2

  • Modelling structure and behaviour
    • Exercise 1: Model the structure and behaviour as shown in the video.
    • Exercise 2: Model the structure and behaviour for a bathtub with water, a faucet and a drain.
  • Causal relations and simulating trends 
    • Exercise 1: Model the causal relations shown in the video and run the simulations.
    • Exercise 2: Model the causal relations governing the amount, height and pressure of water in a bathtub.

LS3

LS4

  • Modelling causes of change and their propagation
    • Exercise 1: Model the causal relations as shown in the video and run the simulations.
    • Exercise 2: Model the causal relations for a faucet, water and drain belonging to a bathtub.
  • Modelling the relative strength of processes
    • Exercise 1: Model the relative strengths of processes as shown in the video and run the simulations.
    • Exercise 2: Model the relative strengths of inflow (from the faucet) and outflow (from the drain) in the bathtub system and run the simulations.
  • Modelling equilibrium seeking mechanisms
    • Exercise 1: Model the equilibrium seeking mechanism as shown in the video and run the simulations.
    • Exercise 2: Model the equilibrium seeking mechanism in a communicating vessels system.
  • Modelling System boundaries
    • Exercise 1: Model human carbon emissions as an exogenous process as shown in the video.
  • Causal relations exercises
    • Exercise 1: For each of the following types of causal relations, provide 2 examples of pairs of quantities that are related through such a causal relation: (1) positive influences, (2) negative influences, (3) positive proportionalities and (4) negative proportionalities.
    • Exercise 2: Provide 2 examples quantities that are causally affected by opposing
      causal relations (positive and negative) and the quantities that affect them
      for: (1) opposing influences and (2) opposing proportionalities.
  • Causal relations exercises (answers)
  • Feedback loops
    • Exercise 1: Prove examples of the following feedback loops: (1) a positive direct feedback loop, (2) a positive indirect positive feedback loop, (3) a negative direct feedback loop), and (4) a negative indirect feedback loop (different from those shown in the video).

Software explanation

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